Environment

Europe’s last wild river Is about to get dammed

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Time - The paddlers slap the hulls of their candy colored kayaks with open palms, sending deep thunks bouncing off the walls of the Albanian prime minister’s offices in Tirana, the capital. Chants of “No dams!” join the thumping, as nearly a hundred residents of Kuta, an ancient village threatened with flooding by a proposed dam project on the Vjosa River, join the demonstration. Rok Rozman, a Slovenian Olympic rower, biologist and environmental campaigner, hoists a kayak covered in dozens of signatures protesting the dam, and heaves it over the heads of the police line protecting the building. Another kayaker catches it and tries to run it up the steps of the offices to place it on the prime minister’s doorstep, but is roughly stopped by police. The boat crashes to the ground and is kicked back amidst the demonstrators. 
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Time to listen to the ice scientists about the Arctic death spiral

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Guardian - Ice scientists are mostly cheerful and pragmatic. Like many other researchers coolly observing the rapid warming of the world, they share a gallows humour and are cautious about entering the political fray.
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Scientists warn world will miss key climate target

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Guardian - Leading climate scientists have warned that the Earth is perilously close to breaking through a 1.5C upper limit for global warming, only eight months after the target was set.
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Global warming may cause flooding in Himalayas but drought in Andes

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Times of India - In a unique study showing how different regions of the planet may react to global warming differently, researchers have shown that people in the Himalayas will have to contend with flooding, while those in the Andes will have longer dry spells and less water.
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Mapuche group burns machinery In Patagonia as part of land claim

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Bubblear.com - Members of the Mapuche Ancestral Resistance, an organization that fights for the rights of the indigenous Mapuche community, this morning burned two excavator machines belonging to English businessman Joe Lewis in Río Negro Province. The machines were laying down power lines between a hydroelectric plant owned by Lewis and the city of El Bolsón.
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Warmer oceans driving Antarctic Peninsula glacier melt

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Carbobrief.org - The Antarctic Peninsula is a long, relatively narrow limb extending 800 miles out from West Antarctica, and is home to hundreds of glaciers.
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Climate change claims a lake, and a way of life

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New York TimesThe water receded and the fish died. They surfaced by the tens of thousands, belly-up, and the stench drifted in the air for weeks.
 
The birds that had fed on the fish had little choice but to abandon Lake Poopó, once Bolivia’s second-largest but now just a dry, salty expanse. Many of the Uru-Murato people, who had lived off its waters for generations, left as well, joining a new global march of refugees fleeing not war or persecution, but climate change.
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Chile producing so much solar energy it’s giving electricity away for free

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EcoWatch - In a new Bloomberg reportChile Has So Much Solar Energy It’s Giving It Away for Free, solar capacity from the country’s central grid has increased four fold to 770 megawatts since 2013. Another 1.4 gigawatts will be added this year with many solar power projects under development.
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12,000 years ago, humans and climate change made a deadly team

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New York TimesClimate change, habitat destruction, extinctions — the Earth has seen it all before, thousands of years ago. And humans may have been partly to blame for many of those changes in nature, too.
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How fast are renewables growing? LCD TV provides an analogy

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Forbes - Natural gas and coal combined were even smaller than “other”.
 
That was perhaps the most interesting takeaway in the U.S. Solar Market Insight from GTM Research and The Solar Energy Industries Association study of new generation capacity for the U.S. in Q1 2016. Solar accounted for 64% of new capacity with 1.67 new gigawatts coming online while wind chipped in for 33%. “Other” sources like oil furnaces, biomass and small hydro accounted for 3%. Natural gas, meanwhile, clocked in at 1%. Put another way, fossil beat wave technology and small nuclear, but fell behind pellet boilers.
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