Outdoors

Climbing: Patagonia 2013-14, a return to the meteorological norm

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The Alpinist - For the last few seasons, dry conditions in Patagonia opened access to typically elusive peaks—the Ragni (M4 90 degrees, 600m) became Cerro Torre's standard route (with the help of the weather and Hayden Kennedy and Jason Kruk's bolt-chopping on the Compressor route), and between Christmas and New Year's Day 2013 more than 40 people summited. The great conditions also allowed climbers to complete routes that for many years were just watched and talked about, like the coveted 1000-meter Pilar del Sol Naciente (5.12b A1 WI6 M6) and Venas Azules (M5 AI6, 950m) on Torre Egger, along with many other routes.
 

Make it really big: Rolo Garibotti

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Black Diamond Equipment - Built from hand-peeled timbers and adobe brick, Rolando Garibotti’s small cabin sits on a main street in the wind-swept tourist outpost of El Chaltén, Argentina. The house’s sturdy frame is a necessity in these parts—at nearly 50° south, El Chaltén sits in a sort of atmospheric line of fire, where ocean-bound storms circle the globe unimpeded by land, gathering momentum before smashing into the tip of South America. Near the door, a small, hand-carved sign reads “World’s Worst Weather,” but inside, it’s warm and serene, and a kettle on the stove boils water for maté.
 

British climbers are the first to scale staggering rock faces in Patagonia

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Daily Mail Online - A young British man has become the first climber to scale the biggest unclimbed rock face in Patagonia.
 
Calum Muskett, 20, went on two expeditions to conquer sections of the 14-mile-long mountain range in the Torres del Paine National Park.
 

Running in the cathedral of Patagonia

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Trail Runner Magazine - On Chile’s coat of arms, opposite a regal condor, is a crowned animal with a coffee-colored coat and coal-black hooves. This creature, known as ahuemul, is a type of South Andean deer that, unfortunately, due to poaching, logging and food scarcity, is at risk for going extinct.
 

Charlie Porter dies

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Rock and Ice - Pioneering soloist and adventurist Charlie Porter has reportedly died in Punta Arenas, Chile, from heart problems.

Porter was born in Massachusetts in 1951, and by the early 1970s was one of America’s leading rock climbers. Notably, he made the first ascent, solo, of Zodiac in 1972 on El Cap. That same year he also established the iconic Shield, and the next year followed up with first ascents of Mescalito and Tangerine Trip, a line that was then the steepest on El Cap.  In 1975, Porter put up Excalibur using an innovative bong-and-wood-block sandwich to overcome the route’s lengthy section of flaring six-inch crack. This in an era before the invention of cams and most gear that we now take for granted.
 

Fitz Roy Traverse: Tommy Caldwell and Alex Honnold complete first ascent in Patagonia

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PlanetMountain.com - From 12 - 16 February 2014 the Americans Tommy Caldwell and Alex Honnold completed the coveted first traverse of the major ridge line of Fitz Roy in Patagonia.
 

Chad Kellogg killed by rockfall In Patagonia

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Climbing - American climber Chad Kellogg has been killed while climbing in Patagonia. According to local authority and guidebook author Rolando Garibotti, Kellogg and Jens Holsten had climbed theAfanassieff Route on the northwest ridge of Fitz Roy. They reached the top in late afternoon on February 14 and began their descent via the Supercanaleta route.
 

Biking in Patagonia: Why to go and what to expect

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Voxxi.com - Argentina’s Patagonia region, located in the southern cone of South America, is one of the world’s most impressive cycling destinations.
 
Comprised of three regions in Argentina, Patagonia encompasses mountains, endless miles of arid steppe, and a portion of the country’ coast. The world’s seventh largest desert takes up a large section of Patagonia, while the area’s population, according to The Patagonia Foundation, is a mere 1-2 people per square kilometer.
 

The next best trout lodge in Patagonia

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Field and Stream - If you want to catch astoundingly large rainbow trout—sometimes several in one day—and you're willing to travel (almost literally) to the end of the earth to do so, there's a new lodge operation worth putting on your bucket list. It's called Kooi Noom, which loosely translates to, "the fish path," and it is located in one of the most remote places in Argentina. Mark my words: This place is going to generate plenty of buzz (and plenty of impressive photographs) in the coming months. I am the first writer to visit this lodge and experience the fishing here. And what I have seen so far is remarkable.
 

Aysén Challenge raises sustainability awareness through sport

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ThisisChile.cl - Even though the weather is starting to warm up, preparations are well underway for a frigid winter race that takes brave participants over rivers, around lakes and down frozen roads in Chile’s Aysén Region. 
 
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