Blogs

Tourism reserve flows: A necessity for river conservation

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By Juan Carlos Cuchacovich 
 
Editors Note: The following is from Issue 12.
 
Chile’s Water Code, issued in 1981, created a regulatory instrument that established entirely a neoliberal economic policy. These water regulations permitted perpetual, tradable water claims to be assigned via the market. This touched off a race that resulted in the assignment of the majority of rivers to whomever presented the corresponding requests, and the spoils were distributed without consideration for the environment, geopolitics, public health, or equity.
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Why rivers need permanent protection

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By Monti Aguirre
 
Editors Note: The following is from Issue 12.
 
Not everyone knows that the rise of modern environmental legislation started with a river – several of them, in fact.  
 
In the 1960s, after decades of rampant dam-building in the United States, the country’s waterways were suffering. Anglers found fish were becoming scarce in streams that had once been thick with them. Hunters found wildlife increasingly thin on the ground. Rafters found that rapids had been swallowed up by reservoirs, and the West’s great wild rivers had been transformed into stairsteps of stagnant water.
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10 reasons to visit and protect Puelo

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The legacy of Douglas Tompkins

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Editors Note: A year ago today, Douglas Tompkins passed away in a kayaking accident in the Aysen region of Chile near the future Patagonia National Park. In remembrance, the following is excerpted from our special tribute to Tompkins in Issue 10 of Patagon Journal.
 

By Jimmy Langman
 
Like the rest of Patagonia, Lago General Carrera in the Aysen region, the second-largest lake in South America, is prone to volatile weather. Powerful westerly winds regularly come in from the Pacific, gather in the Andes, then swoop down to the lake in a full-force gale turning its waters into a veritable ocean. The morning of December 8, 2015, changed drastically so after Doug Tompkins together with five of his friends set out on the third day of an extended kayak trip. 
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Participate in the 3rd Patagonia Photo Contest!

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Patagon Journal announces the launch of its 3rd Patagonia Photo Contest. 
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Infographic: Rivers of Chile under threat

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Chile’s threatened rivers

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Photo: Baker River. Jimmy Langman/Patagon JournalPhoto: Baker River. Jimmy Langman/Patagon Journal
 
 
By Nathalie Joignant

Editors Note: The following is from Issue 12.
 
Rivers and wetlands are the veins that carry our lifeblood. Simply put, they allow our existence. In addition to water they provide countless environmental services to humans and other species, among them: food, biodiversity habitat, fibers, medicinal material, fodder for livestock, irrigation for food crops in adjacent lands, construction materials, spaces for recreation and spiritual development, and flood control. People have historically settled along their banks, ranging from small towns to big cities. But today, due to corporate greed and government irresponsibility, many rivers are drying up or under imminent threat.
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Chile’s House of Deputies approves Water Code reform

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Chile Sustentable By a vote of 63 in favor, 32 against and 3 abstaining, the plenary of the House of Deputies approved new legislation to confirm water is a fundamental human right. The decision will modify the Water Code in force since 1981, prior to democratic participation in the country.
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