Into the Patagonian steppe

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For me, the Patagonian steppe represents incredible beauty and the solitude I’ve longed for my entire life. Born an introverted soul, I find great joy in emptiness and get giddy about privacy. The steppe promises comfort and peace to me, offering up contemplation and quiet. But, as I discovered on a Sunday as we headed east toward a remote ranch where we’d been invited for an asado, it’s not all placid stillness out here. The steppe, like most of the modern world, is caught in transition. It’s a place in motion.
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Photo safari in the southern seas

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The cameras are the protagonists on this trip onboard the Forrest. It's eight days of navigating through the Patagonian and Fuegian channels, where each trip is different from the last. Changes in season, light, weather and even the groups' interests can make each trip unique. 

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Red tides and climate change in Tierra del Fuego

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Ushuaia sits at the edge of the world. Nestled on the largest island of the archipelago that makes up Tierra del Fuego—the southern tip of South America—the city has doubled in the last twenty years to 60,000 people. Urbanization, coupled with climate change, is having an adverse effect on the waters that permeate Tierra del Fuego and contaminating the shellfish that are a staple of the local diet.
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Cicloturismo: a new way to explore Chile’s Maule Region

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Pedaling along the southern coast of Duao, Chile, our leader Luis veered off the highway onto a path leading to the beach.  “C’mon!” he exclaimed, “let’s put these mountain bikes to work!”  We followed him in, plowing deep trails into the sand.  Like Icarus and the sun, I skirted the ocean’s receding white foam, confident in my and the bike’s ability to outpace an oncoming wave.  But, even before Luis’ warning cry reached my ears, a wave crashed down on my wheels, spilling sand over the frame.  The rest of the day to the group’s amusement my gears squeaked with every pedal stroke, the penalty for my brashness. 
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Darwin's fox: the rarest in South America

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Darwin’s fox (Lycalopex fulvipes) is having a hard time finding refuge. Only a few hundred of the squat, dark-coated foxes survive today in the remaining patches of temperate rainforest that once stretched along the entire coast of southern Chile. Much of their habitat has been destroyed, or replaced with pine and eucalyptus tree farms. There is also another, more hounding, concern.
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