Bariloche: Winter wonderland once more

E-mail Print

 

Normally in July, Bariloche, Argentina, is a month into ski season. Cerro Catedral, Bariloche’s launch point into the Andes Mountains, overflows with ski schools, tourists, and locals all vying to ski the resort’s groomed slopes, backcountry trails, and terrain park. But this winter has been marred by the potent combination of Chile’s Puyehue Volcano eruption, whose ashes have disrupted flights all over Argentina, and a rare lack of snow.

Read more...
 

Whale watching in Argentine Patagonia

E-mail Print

The Southern Right Whales come to the Golfo San Jose and the Golfo Nuevo, the two inland gulfs of the Peninsula Valdes which juts out into the Southern Atlantic Coast of Argentine Patagonia, between September and early December of each year for two reasons which are closely related: to mate and to raise their calves.

Read more...
 

Species Profile: Old Man’s Beard Lichen

E-mail Print
 
 
You won’t meet many lichen-watchers, with binoculars focused on tree trucks and rock faces.  The Discovery Channel rarely profiled lichens alongside footage of lions and tigers stalking their prey.  Most of us probably don’t remember the name of a single species of lichen. Nonetheless, lichens are some of the most unique organisms on the planet, and Old Man’s Beard (Usnea barbata) represents one of the most prevalent and characteristic species in Patagonian forest ecosystems.
Read more...
 

Tracking Silencio, huemul of the Baker River

E-mail Print

Patagon Journal received this report from Conservacion Patagonica park guards who recently tracked huemuls inhabiting the areas around the Baker River that would be flooded if the HidroAysen dams are built. These huemuls, Chile's national emblem, are an endangered deer species that this organization is helping to restore to the Aysen region, and more specifically, to the areas encompassing the future Patagonia National Park. Conservacion Patagonia will donate the approximately 200,000 acres they have purchased in the Chacabuco Valley since 2004 to help form this park, which will also include some 460,000 acres of the neighboring Jeinimeni and Tamango National Reserves. This promises to be a major conservation achievement, and potentially a boost to tourism for Aysen on the scale Torres del Paine National Park has been for the Magallanes region.  
Read more...
 

Monitoring pumas in Aysén

E-mail Print
 
 
 
 
Seeing a puma borders on impossible. Many of us who have lived in Aysen have never seen one at all, or at most have spotted a tail slipping off into the bushes. Hunting by night, notoriously stealthy, pumas have a way of eluding sight. Impressively large paw prints and scattered remnants of guanacos and other prey offer the most visible signs of these mighty top predators.
Read more...
 
Page 19 of 20