Climb the volcanoes of southern Chile

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Life in southern Chile is defined by the close relationship it has with the natural landscapes of the region. Volcanoes and glaciers dominate the land here, shaping the geology and making a profound impact on local culture.
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Infographic: 5 Giants of Patagonia

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Some defend the magnitude of Patagonian climbing by arguing that despite only reaching 4,000 meters, Patagonia offers walls with slopes that leave nothing to envy the Himalayas, or that the "alpine" starts at sea level, where numerous glaciers shed their ice.
 
If there is anything that the Patagonia teaches us it is that the experience a mountain offers a climber cannot be measured in meters. It is something that would require a far more complex metric that, if it did exist, would be absolutely meaningless.
 
This is not to say that the great mountains do not offer a particular attraction with their size and promise of limitless horizons. It means that other smaller peaks, often hidden, offer huge challenges that can mark a before and after in one’s life.
 
Here we will talk of the giants that have attracted the traveler’s attention the most: Mount San Valentín, which dominates the horizons of Aysen; San Lorenzo, which dizzily rises between forest and prairie; El Chalten -or Fitz Roy -a mythical rock monolith that has beckoned climbers from around the world. Or Paine Grande, alone in its height but contemplated year after year by thousands of travelers, and finally, Mount Sarmiento, the forgotten king in Tierra del Fuego.
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Legendary kayaker Josh Lowry dies

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(Editor’s note: Josh Lowry was well-known not just in Futaleufu, where he was owner and lead guide of the outfitter Futaleufu Explore, but in the global paddling community. Credited with first descents on the Baker and Pascua rivers in Chilean Patagonia, according to the bio on his website over the past three decades he had explored more than 90 rivers in Chile. Tyler Williams of Funhog Press contributes this obituary).
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Announcing the winners of the 2nd Patagonia Photo Contest

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 Grand prize winner, 1st place in Travel & Culture category, and Reader's Choice Award: Doma  (Federico R. Grosso)
 
 
With his magnificent photo entitled “Doma,” Patagon Journal is proud to announce that the undisputed grand prize winner of the 2nd Patagonia Photo Contest, from among this year’s more than 2200 entries from 14 countries, is Federico R. Grosso of Villla La Angostura, Argentina.
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Under a deluge: Global warming, glaciers and dams on the Baker River

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By Jimmy Langman
 
Editors Note: The following article is from Issue 1 of Patagon Journal.
 
 
Three years ago, the Baker River in Aysen Patagonia suddenly tripled in size, causing a virtual river tsunami. In less than 48 hours, roads, bridges, and farms were severely damaged and dozens of livestock drowned. Residents were in disbelief. Jonathan Leidich, an American whose company regularly leads tourists on treks up to nearby glaciers, hiked to the Colonia Glacier at the eastern flank of the Northern Patagonian Ice Field and discovered the source of the mysterious flood: Lake Cachet 2 had vanished. This enormous, two-square-mile glacial lake had emptied its 200 million cubic meters of water in just a matter of hours.
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