From Paris to Patagonia: On rivers and climate change

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By Patrick Lynch
 
In the Patagonia region, climate change presents a direct threat to human health and the environment. More than 90% of Patagonia’s glaciers are receding, [1] endangered marine species are shifting migration ranges as the ocean warms, and in some rural communities the water table has dropped so far below historical levels that water is now being trucked to people’s doorsteps.[2] These dwindling resources like glaciers and rivers need legislation to protect them and regulate uses that could accelerate their loss.
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Mystery whale deaths: Is climate change the cause?

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By Katie McConnell
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Interview: Raúl Castro, director of NOLS Patagonia

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Photo: Felipe PimentelPhoto: Felipe Pimentel

 

The renowned outdoor leadership school has spread its philosophy through its courses for more than 25 years in Chile.

By Ignacio Palma
Translation by Andy Ford
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Our Climate Change in Patagonia series

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Scientists say in order to maintain a natural balance on Earth, one that provides the environmental conditions upon which all life depends, the amount of carbon dioxide contained in the atmosphere should be below 350 parts per million (ppm). At the beginning of human civilization our atmosphere naturally contained around 275 ppm. Humanity’s growing reliance on coal, oil, and natural gas, or fossil fuels, spiked tremendously the amount of carbon dioxide beginning in the late 20th century. Today, we have 404 ppm of CO2 in the atmosphere, and its rising every year, moving us increasingly farther away from the 350 ppm goal.
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The changing landscape of Patagonia

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The author and partner, Brinannala Morgan walk across the meltwater pools on the surface of the Campo de Heilo Norte with the Torres and the Circo de los Altares in the background.The author and partner, Brinannala Morgan walk across the meltwater pools on the surface of the Campo de Heilo Norte with the Torres and the Circo de los Altares in the background.
 
 
Text and photos by Jonathan Byers
 
Looking out across a glacial lake in a rocky valley below Cerro Fitz Roy in Los Glaciares National Park, I had with me a black and white photograph taken 80 years earlier at this very same spot by the Italian priest and mountaineer, Alberto de Agostini. In the photo by Agostini, a massive glacier filled the valley floor. The scene in front of me a century later was starkly different, with several kilometers of ice in the valley completely gone.
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