Climate Change: There is no Plan B, because there's no Planet B

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People's Climate march in New York City, Sept. 21, 2014People's Climate march in New York City, Sept. 21, 2014
 
 
By Javiera Espinoza
 
Last Sunday, September 21, more than 600,000 people through nearly 2,800 events in 166 countries took to the streets to promote actions to stop the effects of climate change. The “People’s Climate March” aimed to get the attention of governments and demand they take decisive and drastic action on climate issues, making it the largest march to combat climate change in history. Without looking further afield, more than 310,000 people marched just in New York, including UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon himself, as well as former United States Vice President Al Gore. It is precisely in this city where the United Nations General Assembly is meeting this week, during which Ban Ki-moon convened a “Climate Summit” on September 23. The purpose of the Climate Summit was to call on global leaders to make statements concerning climate change to advance on achieving a new global climate agreement in 2015, which would replace the Kyoto Protocol, which became obsolete in 2012.
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New Zealand and the proposal to legitimize scientific whaling in the Southern Ocean Sanctuary

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By Elsa Cabrera and Juan Carlos Cardenas
Translation by Ecoceanos
 
Following the landmark ruling of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) last March 31, that revoked Japanese so-called "scientific" whaling permits in Antarctica, it was expected that the International Whaling Commission (IWC) could finally resolve the many conflicts generated by these operations, which constitute a violation of the global moratorium on commercial whaling and the Southern Ocean whale sanctuary.
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In the balance: Puelo's and Chile's future

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Editors Note: The following is from Issue 6
 
By Rodrigo Condeza
 
It´s a fact, the rivers of southern Chile are under heavy pressure from energy companies pushing hydropower schemes. But why? The law is clear: if a company does not utilize its freely acquired water rights, or refuses to pay taxes on them, or returns said rights to the State, these rights are then made available on the free market.
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Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. on HidroAysen and Patagonia

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Around this time last year, we published an exclusive interview with Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. in the winter edition of Patagon Journal. Kennedy spoke to us about the environmental threats to the Futaleufu River and Chilean Patagonia. Here is a link to that interview.
 
Now, Kennedy is back in the news in Chile. Kennedy, who is president and co-founder of the international Waterkeeper Alliance and a leading environmental lawyer in the United States, has recently been featured in articles in Chile’s Que Pasa magazine and the La Tercera newspaper giving his views on HidroAysen and the current energy and dams debate. He also talks about his future plans, much of which will be done in concert with Futaleufú Riverkeeper, Patagonia's first Waterkeeper program.  Recently, we were given the full transcript from the interview he did for those media. Excerpts:
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Issue 6 – The Giants of Patagonia

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Father Alberto de Agostini, the Salesian priest who during the first half of the 19th century wrote 22 books about his explorations in the Patagonian Andes, put it most eloquently when describing this region’s mountains: “Hundreds of peaks still sleep a deep sleep without any human ever penetrating their silent kingdom, an exclusive domain of winds and storms. And nevertheless they are the most beautiful mountains of the world.” 
 
The mountains of Patagonia are “giants” not just for their sheer size. There is that unparalleled beauty, as Agostini so rightly states. They may not be the highest peaks on the planet, but the extreme conditions and vertical walls found at this southernmost end of the planet make their summits among the world’s most difficult to scale.  And then there is the sheer expanse of the Andes, the longest mountain range on Earth. This issue of Patagon Journal is dedicated to the magnificent Patagonian mountains, and the bold climbers and mountaineers that seek out their rewards.
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