Blogs

Making conservation history: Interview with Kris Tompkins

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The new Patagonia National Park. Photo: Conservacion PatagonicaThe new Patagonia National Park. Photo: Conservacion Patagonica
 
 
Twenty-six years after Douglas Tompkins purchased the initial properties that would later form the world’s largest private conservation project in history, his dream has become reality. On Wednesday, Chile President Michelle Bachelet formally accepted a proposal from Tompkins Conservation, the non-profit organization formed by Tompkins to implement his conservation activities, to create what will become one of the great jewels of the world – a magnificent network of 17 national parks in Chilean Patagonia.
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Fly Fishing Show 2017: Interview with Ben Furimsky

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Patagon Journal has had an alliance with the Fly Fishing Show, the largest fly fishing event in the United States, for some four years now. This year we renewed that partnership. Ben Furimsky, the president and ceo of the Fly Fishing Show, spoke with us about the great success and some of the changes with this year’s events, which were held in seven cities from January through early March: Denver (CO), Marlborough (MA), Somerset (NJ), Atlanta (GA), Lynwood (WA), Pleasanton (CA), and Lancaster (PA).
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NRDC InfoMap: Protect Chile’s Patagonia with clean energy alternatives to mega dams

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Mount Fitz Roy: Surmounting a dream

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By Michael Sanchez
Translation by Abigail Nobes
 
Editors Note: The following is from Issue 13.
 
Unbearable are the nights spent waiting for the chance to be there again. I had already tried to go before, without success, and now I looked for a new opportunity. My first attempt to climb Mount Fitz Roy was during the winter season. Unfortunately, one of my closest climbing friends, and others, suffered severe frostbite, which caused us to turn away from the summit. The next summer, poor weather conditions made us give up again, further still transforming Fitz Roy into the mountain of my dreams. 
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Issue 13 - National Parks

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In our fifth anniversary issue, we feature a special section about national parks and, as always, diverse other articles on 100 pages about nature and the environment, culture, travel and outdoor sports in Patagonia and the world’s last wild places.
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Before leaving for the Patagonian Icefields

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By Andrés Pinto 
Translation by Patrick Nixon
Photos by Carlos Hevia
 
Editors Note: Andrés Pinto is part of the Vida Glaciar project, part of the University of Chile mountaineering club, which seeks to transmit to the public the importance of the Andean glaciers and the need for their protection. This month they will be going on a 3-week expedition to the Southern Patagonian Ice Fields. 
 
 
We needed to climb, but the weather was not working in our favor, even though we wanted to run into a storm. The route was closed and our options were diminishing. Our idea was to do our last practice on the ice of the hanging glacier before heading off on February 2 to Patagonia to try and summit one of the mountains we had planned for, and of course, collect the necessary audiovisual data for our educational project.
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Tourism reserve flows: A necessity for river conservation

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By Juan Carlos Cuchacovich 
 
Editors Note: The following is from Issue 12.
 
Chile’s Water Code, issued in 1981, created a regulatory instrument that established entirely a neoliberal economic policy. These water regulations permitted perpetual, tradable water claims to be assigned via the market. This touched off a race that resulted in the assignment of the majority of rivers to whomever presented the corresponding requests, and the spoils were distributed without consideration for the environment, geopolitics, public health, or equity.
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Why rivers need permanent protection

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By Monti Aguirre
 
Editors Note: The following is from Issue 12.
 
Not everyone knows that the rise of modern environmental legislation started with a river – several of them, in fact.  
 
In the 1960s, after decades of rampant dam-building in the United States, the country’s waterways were suffering. Anglers found fish were becoming scarce in streams that had once been thick with them. Hunters found wildlife increasingly thin on the ground. Rafters found that rapids had been swallowed up by reservoirs, and the West’s great wild rivers had been transformed into stairsteps of stagnant water.
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10 reasons to visit and protect Puelo

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