Endangered huemul sited in the Puelo Valley

Print
 
Great news! Thanks to hidden cameras scientists have made the first sighting of the endangered huemul deer in northern Patagonia, in the Puelo River watershed. In the past, the habitat for huemuls ranged from central Chile to the southernmost edge of the continent, but due to hunting, invasives species, and habitat loss they were driven to near extinction. This study was sponsored by Puelo Patagonia, Tompkins Conservation and National Geographic, and they are now seeking to establish a binational corridor between Argentina and Chile to aid the long-term conservation of this species.
 
 
Thanks in part to accounts of rural settlers living in this remote region of the Andes, the rare huemul deer has been discovered in an area of the Puelo Valley that had no previous record of holding this species. Photo: National Geographic SocietyThanks in part to accounts of rural settlers living in this remote region of the Andes, the rare huemul deer has been discovered in an area of the Puelo Valley that had no previous record of holding this species. Photo: National Geographic Society
 
 
  Puelo Valley, located about 100 miles from the regional capital of Puerto Montt via an unpaved road and ferry transit on Lake Tagua Tagua, is a mountainous region near the Argentine border that has seen little development. Photo: National Geographic Society Puelo Valley, located about 100 miles from the regional capital of Puerto Montt via an unpaved road and ferry transit on Lake Tagua Tagua, is a mountainous region near the Argentine border that has seen little development. Photo: National Geographic Society
 
 
Native to Chile and Argentina, the huemul deer has been reduced to a population of approximately 2000 individuals. Photo: National Geographic SocietyNative to Chile and Argentina, the huemul deer has been reduced to a population of approximately 2000 individuals. Photo: National Geographic Society
 
 
Found in both Chile and Argentina, the huemul is increasingly restricted to remote sectors that are difficult to access. Photo: National Geographic SocietyFound in both Chile and Argentina, the huemul is increasingly restricted to remote sectors that are difficult to access. Photo: National Geographic Society
 
 
Continuing this monitoring program to collect scientific data on the behavior of the species will be crucial in developing conservation plans using a cross-border approach in conjunction with non-governmental organizations, the state and local communities. Photo: National Geographic SocietyContinuing this monitoring program to collect scientific data on the behavior of the species will be crucial in developing conservation plans using a cross-border approach in conjunction with non-governmental organizations, the state and local communities. Photo: National Geographic Society
 
 
 
 
Related articles :